Til Debt Do Us Part (2) – Chapter 13s

WHAT BANKRUPTCY CAN’T DO: Divorce Debt? Domestic Support Obligations part 3

Bankruptcy helps relieve the burden of credit card and loan debts, medical bills, back utilities and rent, and so forth.

But there are some debts that bankruptcy does not affect; that are “immune” from a bankruptcy discharge – the word is “non-dischargeable”. This means that when the smoke clears and the bankruptcy is over, these debts will still have to be paid.

My previous blogs were about taxes, traffic fines, speeding tickets, student loans and all the various types of what I call Intentional Debt. Lately my focus has been on Child Support/Alimony/Maintenance/Domestic Support Obligations. Last time we talked about these debts surviving Chapter 7.

But a Chapter 13 is different. If a debt from a divorce decree or settlement is in the form of a property settlement it is NOT a DSO is therefore IS dischargable in a Chapter 13 case.

It may be a DSO in a Chapter 7, but NOT a DSO in a Chapter 13.

Huh?

Case law has developed a thorough test to distinguish a DSO from a property settlement agreement. It is a huge list of factors that the judge needs to review.

  1. Whether the settlement agreement includes payment for the ex‐spouse;
  2. Whether there is any indication that provisions within the agreement were intended to balance the relative income of the parties;
  3. The position of the assumption to pay debts within the agreement;
  4. The character of method of payment of the assumption;
  5. The nature of the obligation;
  6. Whether children resulted which had to be provided for;
  7. The relative future earning power of the spouse;
  8. The adequacy of support absent debt assumption;
  9. The parties’ understanding of the provisions;
  10. The label of the obligations;
  11. The age of the parties;
  12. The health of the parties;
  13. Existence of “hold harmless” or assumption terminology;
  14. Whether the assumption terminated upon death or remarriage;
  15. Whether the parties had counsel;
  16. Whether there was a knowing, voluntary, and intelligent waiver of rights;
  17. Length of the marriage;
  18. Employment of the parties;
  19. The demeanor and credibility of the parties;

***

Some examples:

  • A couple has been married for 30 years, since they were teenagers. He went to college and makes $200,000.00 per year. She never went to college and was a stay-at-home Mom and raised the kids. He was ordered to pay the credit cards but then files bankruptcy. She objects to the discharge of these credit cards. This one is pretty easy and leans in her favor.
  • Both couples make $50,000.00 per year and will likely remain at their jobs for many years to come. She was ordered to take on all the credit card debt in exchange for an agreement to NOT pay any alimony or maintenance to her spouse. She files bankruptcy and the spouse challenges the discharge of the debt. This leans in the spouse’s favor.
  • At the time of the divorce both of the divorced couple made $50,000.00 per year and the joint debts were divided more or less evenly. A year later, she lost her job and after months of searching took a job for $25,000.00 per year. She also incurred a lot of medical bills since the divorce due to her chronic illness and lack of insurance. She filed bankruptcy and he challenges the discharge of their debt. This liens in the Debtor’s favor.
  • One spouse agrees to take on all the credit card debt. He files bankruptcy the next day. It has been proven that he consulted with a bankruptcy attorney months ago and has planned to file all along. This leans in favor of the other spouse, too.

Fair to say only about 1% of the cases are this easy. Most are very complicated and each factor has to be weighed.

No one factor carries more weight than another. The bankruptcy judge is given a lot of latitude in reviewing all the factors and how much weight to give each one. You can have all 19 factors on your side plus plenty more and the judge could still rule in favor of your ex-spouse for the reason that something doesn’t seem right.

***

 So what happens in your Chapter 13 regardless of how the debts are determined?

If the debts are ruled as a property settlement the bills are paid with other unsecured debts and discharged after the bankruptcy is completed.

If the debts are ruled as DSOs, they have to be paid as priority unsecured debts. This means they have to be paid in full during the life of the Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Unpaid interest survives. This means even if you pay the entire $10,000.00 in credit card debts you may still owe thousands of dollars in interest when the Chapter 13 is complete.

This may make your plan payment difficult to pay. Those $10,000.00 in DSOs could be as much as $300.00 per month in a 36-month plan. Add your car payment, the house payment, back taxes owed and other fees and your Chapter 13 payment may be unaffordable – the legal phrase is infeasible.

Unless there is another reason to remain in a Chapter 13, you should consider converting to a Chapter 7 and pay the debt on your own terms.

***

A good local bankruptcy attorney will have the experience and knowledge of your district to advise you how the bankruptcy judge of that district views and reviews these factors.

Copyright 2016 Michael Curry

***

About the author: Michael Curry of Curry Law Office in Mount Vernon, Illinois has helped thousands of individuals, family and small businesses in southern Illinois find protection under the Bankruptcy Code for almost twenty-five years. He is also available to help individuals and families with their estate planning (wills, power-of-attorney) and real estate and other sales transactions.

He is also the author of books on finance and bankruptcy available on Kindle through Amazon!

Whether you live in Mount Vernon, Salem, Waltonville, Woodlawn, Lawrenceville, Centralia, Louisville, Xenia, Grayville, Effingham, Dieterich, Vandalia, McLeansboro, Dahlgren, Albion, Flora, Clay City, Kinmundy, Chester, Sparta, Olney, Mount Carmel, Nashville, Fairfield, Cisne, Wayne City, Carmi, Grayville, or anywhere in Southern Illinois call Curry Law Office today at (618) 246-0993 and Finally Be Financially Free!

tags: Bankruptcy Attorney Lawyer Mount Vernon Illinois Centralia Fairfield Carmi

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Til Debt Do Us Part

WHAT BANKRUPTCY CAN’T DO: Divorce Debt? Domestic Support Obligations part 2

Bankruptcy helps relieve the burden of credit card and loan debts, medical bills, back utilities and rent, and so forth.

But there are some debts that bankruptcy does not affect; that are “immune” from a bankruptcy discharge – the word is “non-dischargeable”. This means that when the smoke clears and the bankruptcy is over, these debts will still have to be paid.

My previous blogs were about taxes, traffic fines, speeding tickets, student loans and all the various types of what I call Intentional Debt.

Last time I spoke of Child Support, Alimony, Maintenance and Domestic Support Obligations. That was the introduction. Now I will talk specifically about Chapter 7 (and 11 and 12).

Child Support, Alimony and Maintenance survives Chapter 7. If you are current, if you are behind, if the debt is being collected by the state, or even assigned to the state in exchange for public aid; it will survive bankruptcy.

“My money isn’t even going to the kids or to my ex! It’s going to build the governor’s swimming pool!” Likely true … but it still survives bankruptcy.

***

But what if you were ordered to pay other people (friends or former in-laws), a credit card or the vet bill? Whether it was written in the actual divorce decree, the settlement agreement, ordered by the judge or in any way connected to the dissolution or separation; if it was for a credit card, a personal loan by a friend or family member or one of those loan companies at the strip mall, back utilities, medical bills for the children, vet bills for the pets; ANYTHING you are ordered to pay in the divorce/dissolution case is a DSO in a Chapter 7, 11 or 12. Period. And they survive a bankruptcy.

Okay, got it. But what does that mean?

I must admit that when I say “DSOs survive Chapter 7”; it is a simplistic short-cut. It’s like saying the firing on Fort Sumter started the Civil War: it is true in a way, but it is much more complicated.

The debt itself does NOT actually survive the bankruptcy; your obligation to pay the debt survives the bankruptcy. Your responsibility to protect your ex from collection activities survives the bankruptcy.

As soon as the MasterCard or the hospital receives notice that you file for Chapter 7 (or 11 or 12 or13) bankruptcy, they have to stop all collection activity against you.

YOU.

NOT the codebtor. When the bankruptcy is completed (or during the bankruptcy, but only if the company files the proper paperwork with the court) they can begin or resume collecting on the codebtor. If the debt is a DSO, the codebtor can go back to the divorce court to enforce the divorce/dissolution Order. The debt was discharged, but your obligation and responsibility as to the debt remains!

“The Discover card that HE was ordered to pay in our divorce papers has sued me and garnished $500.00 from my paycheck!”

He will likely be ordered to pay her that $500.00 she was forced to pay Discover.

***

“But the MasterCard is in my name ONLY, not hers (or his).” Are you sure? Double check. If that is the case you are lucky, because your responsibility to protect the codebtor doesn’t really exist. When you file bankruptcy, the MasterCard company cancels the debt. Your ex-spouse? The MasterCard will not go after him. If the company tries to collect on your ex-spouse, and she is NOT a codebtor, she has no more obligation to pay on the debt as your neighbor or your second cousin.

True the credit card company may TRY to collect from the ex-spouse. “Did you ever use it? Don’t you feel morally obligated to pay?”  Don’t let them trick you – the answers are NO.

But you better make sure he/she is NOT a codebtor on the bill!

Remember: the responsibility of protecting the codebtor does not discharge, but if there is no codebtor to protect there is no more responsibility to pay it.

***

An experienced bankruptcy attorney will go through the divorce paperwork with you and review any debts you have been ordered to pay.

“This says you have to pay the Discover card.”

“That was paid off last year with my tax refund.”

“And a Visa.”

“I still owe that.”

“Was that in both your names?”

“No, just mine.”

“This also says she was supposed to pay the MasterCard.”

“That was just in her name.”

In my state, a married couple is responsible for each other’s medical bills. Especially if they were still together when the bill was incurred.

“This says you have to pay Dr. Smith.”

“That was her bill.”

“Were you still together at the time?”

“Yes.”  Then that would be a DSO that would survive his bankruptcy. If he does not pay it, the hospital will try to collect from HER. She can go into the divorce court and enforce the divorce order.

Can anything be done? Not really, not in a Chapter 7.

Chapter 13s are different, though.  More on that next time!

***

Some Debtors do not have a problem with these kinds of debt surviving their bankruptcy if the debts are not too extreme. “I can handle the MasterCard with my ex if the REST of the credit cards get off my back.” You may be asked to sign an acknowledgment saying that you understand that. Read through any acknowledgement, but don’t be too offended by it. The attorney is only protecting himself or herself – this is his or her proof that they DID discuss it with you.

Copyright 2016 Michael Curry

***

About the author: Michael Curry of Curry Law Office in Mount Vernon, Illinois has helped thousands of individuals, family and small businesses in southern Illinois find protection under the Bankruptcy Code for almost twenty-five years. He is also available to help individuals and families with their estate planning (wills, power-of-attorney) and real estate and other sales transactions.

He is also the author of books on finance and bankruptcy available on Kindle through Amazon!

Whether you live in Mount Vernon, Salem, Waltonville, Woodlawn, Lawrenceville, Centralia, Louisville, Xenia, Grayville, Effingham, Dieterich, Vandalia, McLeansboro, Dahlgren, Albion, Flora, Clay City, Kinmundy, Chester, Sparta, Olney, Mount Carmel, Nashville, Fairfield, Cisne, Wayne City, Carmi, Grayville, or anywhere in Southern Illinois call Curry Law Office today at (618) 246-0993 and Finally Be Financially Free!

tags: Bankruptcy Attorney Lawyer Mount Vernon Illinois Centralia Fairfield Carmi

What Bankruptcy Can’t Do: Divorce Debt, part 1

Domestic Support Obligations 

Bankruptcy helps relieve the burden of credit card and loan debts, medical bills, back utilities and rent, and so forth.

In this blog series of non-dischargeable debt I have not yet described the different kinds of bankruptcy.

This blog is about marital debt. And it is the ONLY type of debt in this blog series that is treated substantially different in the two kinds (or chapters) of bankruptcy you can file. There is a difference with Intentional Debt, true; but that is the difference literally between one word – willful AND malicious (Chapter 7) and willful OR malicious (Chapter 13). A big difference, true, but the difference between the treatment of marital debt is MUCH greater.

So here is a brief review. The bankruptcy code is divided into chapters, just like any book. These are the chapters an individual person can file:

Chapter 7: liquidates/eliminates most debt. You can keep (and keep paying for) property you still owe – like cars, your house, furniture – usually as long as you are current and promise to keep making your payment.

Chapter 13: consolidates most of your debt into one payment – unsecured credit cards, medical bills, your car payment, taxes, sometimes even your house payment (especially if you are behind).

Chapter 11: This is mostly for corporations, but an individual can file a Chapter 11 if his debt exceeds the amount allowed in a Chapter 13. If you owe over $380,000.00 (or so) in unsecured debt, you can’t do a Chapter 13 and have to do a Chapter 11.

Chapter 12: Similar to a Chapter 13 but for farmers and fishermen. Most farmers and fishermen owe much more than $380,000 unsecured (and $1.1 million in secured debt); and cannot contend with the sometimes draconian rules of a Chapter 11. So Congress made the Chapter 12 – an amalgamation of a 13 and an 11.

But there are some debts that bankruptcy does not affect; that are “immune” from a bankruptcy discharge – the word is “non-dischargeable”. This means that when the smoke clears and the bankruptcy is over, these debts will still have to be paid.

My previous blogs were about  taxes, traffic fines, speeding tickets and their ilk, student loans and all the various types of what I call Intentional Debt.

Today I’d like to discuss Child Support, Alimony, Maintenance and other marital debt. The Bankruptcy Code calls it Domestic Support Obligations.

***

So far in this list of non-dischargeable debts there is little difference in what kind of bankruptcy you file. The debt will either discharge or survive. The exception is Intentional Debt’s “willful and malicious” and “willful or malicious”. But this deals with the INTENT of the debt, not the definition of the debt.

For Domestic Support Obligations (DSOs), the type of bankruptcy matters a great deal as to the definition of the debt. DSOs survive Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Period. The argument in a Chapter 13 is whether the debt is a DSO or not! A debt can be a DSO in a 7 but not in a 13.

***

18 USC Section 523(a)(5) & (15) of the Bankruptcy Code says:

 (a) A (bankruptcy) discharge … does not discharge an individual debtor from any debt— …

 (5) for a domestic support obligation; …

 (15) to a spouse, former spouse, or child of the debtor and not of the kind described in paragraph (5) that is incurred by the debtor in the course of a divorce or separation or in connection with a separation agreement, divorce decree or other order of a court of record, or a determination made in accordance with State or territorial law by a governmental unit; …

So what is a Domestic Support Obligation? The Bankruptcy Code provides a definition in

11 USC Section 101(14A):

 The term “domestic support obligation” means a debt that accrues before, on, or after the date of the order for relief in a case under this title, including interest that accrues on that debt as provided under applicable nonbankruptcy law notwithstanding any other provision of this title, that is‐‐

(A) owed to or recoverable by‐‐

(i) a spouse, former spouse, or child of the debtor or such child’s parent, legal guardian, or responsible relative; or

(ii) a governmental unit;

(B) in the nature of alimony, maintenance, or support (including assistance provided by a governmental unit) of such spouse, former spouse, or child of the debtor or such child’s parent, without regard to whether such debt is expressly so designated;

(C) established or subject to establishment before, on, or after the date of the order for relief in a case under this title, by reason of applicable provisions of‐‐

(i) a separation agreement, divorce decree, or property settlement agreement;

(ii) an order of a court of record; or

(iii) a determination made in accordance with applicable nonbankruptcy law by a governmental unit; and

(D) not assigned to a nongovernmental entity, unless that obligation is assigned voluntarily by the spouse, former spouse, child of the debtor, or such child’s parent, legal guardian, or responsible relative for the purpose of collecting the debt.

 ***

All right, so with all that legalese, what are we talking about? Marital Debt is anything you were ordered to pay in a divorce or separation agreement. Anything. Whether you pay it to your ex-spouse or not.

Child support, alimony, maintenance, obviously. But if you were ordered to pay other people (friends or former in-laws), a credit card or the vet bill? Whether it was written in the actual divorce decree, the settlement agreement, ordered by the judge or in any way connected to the dissolution or separation.

They are all DSOs. At least in a Chapter 7.

***

Ick, you say. So what can be done about it?

***

I’ll talk specifically about DSOs in a Chapter 7 next time.

Copyright 2016 Michael Curry

***

About the author: Michael Curry of Curry Law Office in Mount Vernon, Illinois has helped thousands of individuals, family and small businesses in southern Illinois find protection under the Bankruptcy Code for almost twenty-five years. He is also available to help individuals and families with their estate planning (wills, power-of-attorney) and real estate and other sales transactions.

He is also the author of books on finance and bankruptcy available on Kindle through Amazon!

Whether you live in Mount Vernon, Salem, Waltonville, Woodlawn, Lawrenceville, Centralia, Louisville, Xenia, Grayville, Effingham, Dieterich, Vandalia, McLeansboro, Dahlgren, Albion, Flora, Clay City, Kinmundy, Chester, Sparta, Olney, Mount Carmel, Nashville, Fairfield, Cisne, Wayne City, Carmi, Grayville, or anywhere in Southern Illinois call Curry Law Office today at (618) 246-0993 and Finally Be Financially Free!

tags: Bankruptcy Attorney Lawyer Mount Vernon Illinois Centralia Fairfield Carmi

 

 

What Bankruptcy Can’t Do: Embezzlement and Damage Caused while Driving Drunk…

What Bankruptcy CAN’T Do: Intents and Purposes, Part Six

Willful and Malicious

Bankruptcy helps relieve the burden of credit card and loan debts, medical bills, back utilities and rent, and so forth.

But there are some debts that bankruptcy does not affect; that are “immune” from a bankruptcy discharge – the word is “non-dischargeable”. This means that when the smoke clears and the bankruptcy is over, these debts will still have to be paid.

Previous blogs were about  taxes, traffic fines, speeding tickets and their ilk, student loans and Intentional Debt – that is, lying to get a loan – either by preparing a false financial statement or otherwise.

Sometimes people get a loan or cash advance or purchase a luxury item just before filing bankruptcy. The court presumes you bought the item/got the loan with no intention of paying for it.

***

Two last examples, and these are pretty obvious …

  • Debts incurred due to embezzlement or fraud while acting in a fiduciary capacity. If you are in charge of your child’s or parent’s trust account and buy yourself a condo in Bermuda, yep … non-dischargeable.
  • Injury to a person or their property while operating a vehicle while intoxicated. At first this law said motor vehicles only. It was changed to add watercraft and other vessels because someone, somewhere, managed to win an argument that a boat was not a motor vehicle (because in bankruptcy – as far as exemptions go – it is not).

***

            Aren’t these willful and malicious anyway? Not necessarily. If you drained a trust account to pay for your gambling addiction; or if you are an alcoholic …

Are addictions and medical conditions enough to rise to the level of willful and malicious? I wouldn’t want to be the judge to decide that. These exceptions to discharge are specific enough to take that out of the consideration.

***

            What if these issues have not been ruled on yet? “I’ve only been accused, no court has said I embezzled that money!” True, but the bankruptcy court can so rule; or take it back to the circuit court for a hearing and ruling. You may have to hire a criminal attorney (if your bankruptcy attorney does not wish to take the case) to help you.

If you were NOT found to have embezzled the funds, or if it were ruled that you were NOT intoxicated, that’s a big plus in your favor. You might still have to defend yourself in other parts of the bankruptcy code that make a debt non-dischargeable, however.

dui

***

“Intentional Debts” is a large issue with lots of nooks and crannies that an attorney or a creditor can use against you. Obviously you will need to discuss your situation with a good bankruptcy attorney that practices in your area.

Next time I talk about marital debt …

Copyright 2016 Michael Curry

 

***

About the author: Michael Curry of Curry Law Office in Mount Vernon, Illinois has helped thousands of individuals, family and small businesses in southern Illinois find protection under the Bankruptcy Code for almost twenty-five years. He is also available to help individuals and families with their estate planning (wills, power-of-attorney) and real estate and other sales transactions.

He is also the author of books on finance and bankruptcy available on Kindle through Amazon!

Whether you live in Mount Vernon, Salem, Waltonville, Woodlawn, Lawrenceville, Centralia, Louisville, Xenia, Grayville, Effingham, Dieterich, Vandalia, McLeansboro, Dahlgren, Albion, Flora, Clay City, Kinmundy, Chester, Sparta, Olney, Mount Carmel, Nashville, Fairfield, Cisne, Wayne City, Carmi, Grayville, or anywhere in Southern Illinois call Curry Law Office today at (618) 246-0993 and Finally Be Financially Free!

tags: Bankruptcy Attorney Lawyer Mount Vernon Illinois Centralia Fairfield Carmi

What Bankruptcy CAN’T Do: Willful and Malicious

Bankruptcy helps relieve the burden of credit card and loan debts, medical bills, back utilities and rent, and so forth.

But there are some debts that bankruptcy does not affect; that are “immune” from a bankruptcy discharge – the word is “non-dischargeable”. This means that when the smoke clears and the bankruptcy is over, these debts will still have to be paid.

Previous blogs were about  taxes, traffic fines, speeding tickets and their ilk, student loans and Intentional Debt – that is, lying to get a loan – either by preparing a false financial statement or otherwise.

Sometimes people get a loan or cash advance or purchase a luxury item just before filing bankruptcy. The court presumes you bought the item/got the loan with no intention of paying for it.

***

The next series of debts that are not discharged in bankruptcy are those that are a willful and malicious injury to another person or their property.

Willful. An intentional act. This is somewhere between “just an accident” and a moustache-twirling villain.

Malicious means eeeeevil! I once used the phrase “cackling with glee” in a lawsuit where maliciousness was alleged. But it also includes being SO reckless and thoughtless that “it was an accident” doesn’t fly.

If a storm knocks a tree onto my neighbor’s car, it was an accident.

But what if I were sawing down the tree and it smashed into my neighbor’s car? I list this potential debt in my bankruptcy I filed the next day. My neighbor challenges the dischargeability saying it was willful. I may be as sorry as I can be about the damage, he says, but my chopping down my tree was an intentional act.

Does that count?

No judge will see this as anything but an accident. Willful? Yes, by its definition, but still an accident.

Unless …

What if the day before he ran over my dog with that car?

Hmmm …

Or let’s change the facts to make me less vengeful: what if my neighbor asked me to wait five minutes so he could get his keys and move his car but I kept chopping?

These are where law school final exam questions come from.

Here’s another example: I like this one.

Suppose the neighbor’s kid loves to sneak onto my yard and jump into my swimming pool. Especially when I am gone and when it is dark after I have gone to sleep.

I get tired of it, so I drain my pool. The kid jumps in that evening shortly after midnight and breaks his leg.

Willful? Yes, it was not an accident. But willful enough to be nondischargeable?

Malicious? Maybe not.  It was my pool on my yard, the kid was trespassing; I can do what I want! Right?

Well, not really. This question really is iffy and the judge will have to rely on any other facts he or she can get from the case.

If I told the kid’s parents that I drained the pool? It’s pretty obvious I had no intention of causing him harm.

If I left a sign or a note for him? Well, the kid will never see it at midnight …

Good question. I’d hate to be a judge on a case like this.

***

That is the rule for Chapter 7 liquidation. What about the Chapter 13?

The rule is slightly different – the standard is willful OR malicious.

Wait, isn’t malicious by its definition willful? Yes, but it is one of those phrases that makes the law sound more grandiose than it is.

Willful OR malicious means that, whether you meant to be eeeeevil or not – if you did it with intent, the debt linked to the deed survives the Chapter 13.

Because of this difference between the two standards – willful AND malicious (Chapter 7) versus willful OR malicious (Chapter 13 – the odds are better in a Chapter 7 that a Debtor will win in a dischargeability challenge and better for a creditor in a Chapter 13.

Let’s use the example from above: my neighbor asks me to wait five minutes so he can move his car but I keep chopping my tree anyway. The damage to his car will more likely discharge in a Chapter 7 over a Chapter 13 depending on any other facts you and your attorney will analyze (past animosity between the parties, etc.).

***

Professionals also see these issues in their bankruptcy. Lawyers, doctors, etc. As an attorney I have to ask if there has been any complaints filed and what the rulings were. Were there findings of willfulness or maliciousness? If it has already been ruled on, the bankruptcy judge isn’t going to change it. Bankruptcy Court is not a court of appeals.

I have also seen people who run their own construction business defending these kinds of actions. The siding was poorly done. The landscaping was awful or not completed.

Proving these kinds of businessmen did something willful and malicious is difficult. In order to lose, the maliciousness would have to be so obvious the Debtor’s attorney will try to settle and avoid a hearing before the judge.

 

***

A good local bankruptcy attorney will have the experience and knowledge to know if the injury caused was willful enough to affect the dischargeability of this kind of debt.

***

More “Intentional Debts” next time …

Copyright 2016 Michael Curry

***

About the author: Michael Curry of Curry Law Office in Mount Vernon, Illinois has helped thousands of individuals, family and small businesses in southern Illinois find protection under the Bankruptcy Code for almost twenty-five years. He is also available to help individuals and families with their estate planning (wills, power-of-attorney) and real estate and other sales transactions.

He is also the author of books on finance and bankruptcy available on Kindle through Amazon!

Whether you live in Mount Vernon, Salem, Waltonville, Woodlawn, Lawrenceville, Centralia, Louisville, Xenia, Grayville, Effingham, Dieterich, Vandalia, McLeansboro, Dahlgren, Albion, Flora, Clay City, Kinmundy, Chester, Sparta, Olney, Mount Carmel, Nashville, Fairfield, Cisne, Wayne City, Carmi, Grayville, or anywhere in Southern Illinois call Curry Law Office today at (618) 246-0993 and Finally Be Financially Free!

tags: Bankruptcy Attorney Lawyer Mount Vernon Illinois Centralia Fairfield Carmi